Fishing

Pecans seed summer’s fishing harvest | Outdoors | djournal.com – Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal

Summary

The Boy heard the Old Man downstairs in the kitchen talking to his parents. Frost was thick on the outside of his bedroom window, so thick the little daylight that had so far developed could barely shine through. He pulled a pair of jeans on over his pajama pants, stuck his feet into his boots and clomped down to see what was going on.

“I thought you might want to ride with me to take the pecans to market,” the Old Man said, and the Boy hustled back …….

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The Boy heard the Old Man downstairs in the kitchen talking to his parents. Frost was thick on the outside of his bedroom window, so thick the little daylight that had so far developed could barely shine through. He pulled a pair of jeans on over his pajama pants, stuck his feet into his boots and clomped down to see what was going on.

“I thought you might want to ride with me to take the pecans to market,” the Old Man said, and the Boy hustled back upstairs to finish dressing.

He and the Old Man had spent the last several weeks gathering pecans as they fell from the eight big trees in his front yard. The trees had been planted in the earliest days of commercial pecan operations. Through most of the year, they provided shade, something for cattle to stand under on hot days. In the fall, they presented a welcome cash crop of their own. The Boy knew there were big commercial operations that had tree-shakers and motorized gatherers, but he and the Old Man picked up a couple hundred pounds of good pecans every year with nothing but a few manual tools and their hands. They sold them to a wholesaling outfit an hour down the road, and he presumed those folks put them into the commercial pipeline from there.

The pecan trees were completely mature and several dozen feet tall. He and the Old Man patrolled their grove from late spring on, keeping the freezer filled with the squirrels the growing pecans tempted up from the back pasture. The squirrels’ trespassing was their fatal mistake, and they never went to waste.

By October, the pecans began falling in a gradual process that took several weeks. Though the crop took a while making its descent, the pecans had to be gathered daily as they fell because contact with the damp ground and the luckier squirrels were bad for them.

Generally each year, by the time the Boy was paroled from school for Christmas break, the pecan gathering was complete.

The Old Man, though officially retired, always had several jobs going on, usually welding or doing electrical wiring, but he hated to spend the money that made on fishing supplies. Their fishing budget was mainly supported by the crop of pecans, at least as far as the Boy knew. They had consulted with one another for months, studying the variety of trolling motors their big catalog showed, and the Boy knew which one he wanted to order if the pecan sale went as well as he hoped.

They piled into the cab of the Old Man’s truck and headed south, driving together as the sun peeked through the trees off to their left, talking about the gear they would buy in the spring and the fish they would catch in the summer. A lifetime’s experience separated them, though fishing still brought them together. Of course, …….

Source: https://www.djournal.com/sports/outdoors/pecans-seed-summer-s-fishing-harvest/article_89addd48-c07b-5e14-959d-7fa9f4353af1.html